History

The 2000s: after a century,
 Bardolino rediscovers its crus.

Chapter 1.4

Chapter 1.4.1

At the beginning of the 21st century, the majority of the Bardolino vineyards have been replanted or reorganised. There are now about a hundred wineries in the production zone: alongside tiny, family-run companies that sell just a few thousand bottles operate some of Italy’s largest wine producers. The production sector is subdivided into three almost equal segments: small-to-medium sized estates, cooperatives and large bottling companies.

From 2002 to 2005 the Bardolino region was the focus of a large-scale viticultural zoning project: more than sixty different types of soils were singled out in the production area.

Chapter 1.4.2

Typical characteristics have once again become the keystone for Bardolino wines. In 2011 the British monthly magazine “Decanter” included Bardolino among the ten styles of wine in Italy on which to focus the greatest attention. Richard Baudains wrote: “Bardolino is going back to the juicy reds that it does best, except that it is now making them much, much better".

The major guides have begun to reward some of the wines of Bardolino. In 2012 Gambero Rosso’s “Vini d’Italia” gave its first “Three Glass” award to a Bardolino. The same has happened with the Slow Wine, L’Espresso and Vinibuoni d’Italia guides.

Chapter 1.4.3

In 2015 the Consortium launched the “Bardolino Village” project, which aims to define the zonal characteristics of the wines, based on the areas already described by Giovanni Battista Perez at the end of the nineteenth century, and which were in fact confirmed by the zoning project.

Chapter 1.4.4

In 2018 the Members’ Meeting of the Producers’ Consortium approved the proposal to introduce the three subzones “La Rocca”, “Montebaldo” and “Sommacampagna” in the production regulations.

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The region

Chapter 2.1

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Bardolino

Sommacampagna

Discover subzone

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Bardolino

La Rocca

Discover subzone

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Bardolino

Montebaldo

Discover subzone

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